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Your bike touring adventure in Romania

Cycling on EuroVelo 6: the Romanian leg

EuroVelo 6 also reaches Orsova, Mehedinti County
While  Via Transilvanica is the “route that unites”, the EuroVelo 6 cycling route promises to take you through southern Romania, from the place where the Danube enters the country to the port of Constanța. The route might lack the necessary infrastructure for cyclists, yet many cover it every year. EuroVelo 6, the Romanian leg, offers an extremely picturesque, but sometimes monotonous landscape, hidden architectural gems, small local beaches, and a delicious fish-based gastronomy.
EuroVelo6 Vienna-Constanta Summer 2019
Video: Mariig Hamon

Part of the European network of official cycling routes, EuroVelo 6 is also tagged as "From the Atlantic to the Black Sea" or "the river route" because it follows the course of three rivers - Loire, Rhine, and Danube. The extremely beautiful and diverse landscapes and accessibility make this route one of the most popular in the network.

recommended route Difficulty moderate closed
Distance 4,258 km
Duration 293:16 h
Ascent 7,046 m
Descent 7,011 m

EuroVelo 6 – Atlantic–Black Sea is one of the most popular EuroVelo routes, and it’s little wonder why. Coasts, rivers, castles, top-class ...

from Thierry FRAISSE,   Outdooractive Editors

EUROVELO 6 in romania

The Romanian segment runs parallel to the Danube for most of its course on this territory. That sums up to about 900 km (or 700 if you enter Romania at Drobeta-Turnu Severin). There are several options to enter Romania. The finish line is invariably the Black Sea, whether you stop in the Danube Delta, in Constața, or in other seaside resorts.

EuroVelo 6 in Dobrogea
Photo: Maarten Sepp, CC BY, Flickr

How to enter Romania on EuroVelo 6:

  • via Naidăș Customs (by land), if your last stop in Serbia is Bela Crkva
  • via Moldova Veche Customs, ferry crossing at Usije / Golubac
  • via Iron Gates Bridge 1 (by land) between Novi Sip and Romania (about 14km from Drobeta-Turnu Severin)

Segmenting EuroVelo 6 route in Romania

How many kilometers do you intend to or can cycle in a day? This very much depends on each cyclist. So the legs suggested here are only orientative in terms of distance or division. Moreover, a quick search will display multiple possibilities of segmenting the route or combining the EuroVelo cycling routes in Romania with those in Serbia and Bulgaria.

Naidăș - Drobeta

This first (suggested) segment, which easily falls among the most scenic roads in Romania, takes you through the Danube gorges. The rocky cliffs that form the river banks, ending abruptly in the river, but also the image of the Danube undulating among them are the main attractions of the area.

Make a pit stop at the Iron Gates Museum to learn more about one of the biggest engineering projects in Romania, but also about the overflodding of Ada Kaleh Island. If you have more time, chose a tourist boat trip that promises to show you the flooded caves underneath the cliffs - some of them seem like "blue grottos".

Other attractions along the route:

  • Iron Gates I Bridge
  • Iron Gates Museum
  • Drobeta tourist port
  • The statue with the face of Decebalus

Drobeta - Corabia

Don't leave Drobeta without tasting a glass of "braga" - a sweet and sour Turkish soft drink with multiple digestive properties. Depending on the route you prefer, the road takes you through the vineyards of Vânju Mare. Stop at the wine tasting place here, but careful with that tasting! You'll then pass through  Calafat, a former commercial and tourist port harboring some architectural jewels.

You will pass mostly through plain villages bordered by endless fields. There's little to see around here, except for snapshots of how the local communities live. The few small local beaches are calling for a cool-off if you feel the need. The towns of Corabia and Calafat entice you with comfortable guesthouses, beautiful parks, and lots of tranquility.

Map / Radtour 2010, Passau - Schwarzes Meer, Tag 18
Difficulty
Distance 170.7 km
Duration 11:29 h
Ascent 67 m
Descent 112 m

Radtour 2010, Passau - Schwarzes Meer, Tag 18 Cetate - Corabia Cetate - Maglavit -   ca. 5 km vor Calafat etwas mehr - endlos wirkende Ebenen ...

from Karl-Heinz Schießl,   Community

Corabia - Giurgiu

Perhaps the most monotonous leg, with a flat and rather uninteresting relief, with no other challenges than permanent sun exposure and the lack of shade and greener areas. The tourist objectives are also missing, but do not hesitate to stop in the small villages along the route to interact with people and to find out what life is like on this side of Romania.

Now is the time to decide if you want to make a detour to Bucharest. The capital is not included in the EuroVelo 6 official route, but if you have time and want to spend a day or two in this vibrant city, park your bike in a safe place and take a minibus from Giurgiu - it's the fastest option.

Giurgiu - Călărași

The route starts to get interesting again. Vineyards make a come back into the landscape, you briefly touch upon the Comana Natural Park and you finally see cycling signs! In fact, the only segment logistically prepared as a cycle tourist route is here, around Călărași. Therefore, the attractions on the route are more numerous. Sport fishing is largely encouraged and promoted as a touristic pastime in this area.

Călărași - Black Sea

This last segment takes one by surprise with its varied and extraordinarily beautiful relief. You will admire the Danube again, this time from the height of undulating and even challenging hills. Huge wind turbines guard small patches of agricultural land plots, green oases, and sandy cliffs where dozens of bird species nest.

recommended route Difficulty difficult
Distance 261.9 km
Duration 18:15 h
Ascent 1,370 m
Descent 1,438 m

It is a staged itinerary (2-3 days), entirely on asphalt, partially covering the EuroVelo 6 cycle route.

from Sînziana Mihalache,   Outdooractive Editors

A bath in the Black Sea is definitely the icing on the cake for this stage. But until then, the road might seem neverending, though beautifully colored by rapeseed or poppies - depending on the season, with wind turbines and arid areas.


Good to know

  • What the Romanian leg mostly brings to this cycle route is a welcoming diversity in terms of the natural and rural landscape
  • The authenticity of local communities delights amateur or professional photographers; you can only enjoy this fully via direct experience
  • The Romanian EuroVelo 6 leg is not a real cycling route: it is not marked as such, it does not have separate tracks for cyclists (yet), and heavy traffic and pollution can cause problems
  • Some parts lack accommodation or dining, and camping is sometimes unsafe.
Photo: Fusion of Horizons, CC BY, Flickr

Who can bike along EuroVelo 6 in Romania?

Any cyclist should try the EuroVelo 6 route through Romania at least once, if not entirely, at least parts of it. The route addresses everyone, children and adults alike. Whether you are cycling alone or with friends or family, EuroVelo 6 is about a different kind of tourist experience in Romania, one that involves effort, but also joy, and certainly an experience that will teach you more about your own limits.

When is the best time to cycle EuroVelo 6 in Romania?

The ideal period is either in late spring (May) or early autumn (September-October). First of all, temperatures are more pleasant and it rains a little less. You will either see nature blooming or the moment when it colors in pastel nuances. Plus, some touristy areas such as the Danube Gorges or the seaside resorts are less crowded. It is also possible to find more affordable prices.

How long does it take to cover EuroVelo 6 in Romania?

As long as you want. About 10-14 days would probably be enough for you to enjoy the experience. Given that there's no official route, only some recommended legs, you can enjoy the ride for as long as you want or can. Alternatively, check out the legs suggested by other cyclists in the Outdooractive community or on alternative sources.

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